Installing Window Trim

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There came a day where there was absolutely nothing we could think of to do on the house. No, not because we were finished (we wish), but because everything was waiting on something else to be done before we could continue. For example, we couldn’t finish paneling the ceiling because we were waiting on our wood-stove to arrive so we would know where the chimney goes. We also couldn’t do any more on the bathroom because we needed to order stainless steel sheet metal.

 

So, we decided to get a head start on trim.

 

Why not, right?

 

We decided on 2 3/4″ wide by 3/4″ thick boards for our windows. Remember, we’re making this all by hand, so we have no idea what industry standards are for these things. After some research, we found we were, luckily, in the ballpark. We decided on using poplar wood for a few reasons. For one, poplar is a lighter, inexpensive wood that is easier to work with compared to other hardwoods. We definitely appreciate that. And next, my favorite reason, is that we got to salvage some poplar wood that means something to me.

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I (Sierra) was one of those kids who was outside all the time, playing tag, building forts, having water wars (my house was known for awesome squirt gun water fights) and having other random outdoor adventures. Back then, there was an empty, overgrown plot of land in my neighborhood that my friends and I liked to explore. In the center of it was a giant poplar tree (you see where this is going). It was simply gorgeous. You’d walk by the lot and your eye would immediately be drawn to it. A lot of wildlife lived there too, and apparently once when I was out of town it was struck by lightning (shook the ground, the neighbors said). Anyway, when I became an adult (though I’m still trying to figure out what that means), a builder bought the lot and cut down the tree. He decided to mill the wood himself and use it for the interior trim of his own new house. And let me tell you it is beautiful! Anyway, I told him about my tiny house project and he kindly offered to give us some of his leftover wood from that tree. So for me, having it in the house is kind of like having part of my childhood home with me wherever I go.

 

Cue “D’awww…” in the audience.

 

Okay, the hokey moment is over. Back to the originally scheduled programming.

 

So we milled the wood down and created the trim boards. Next we wanted to sand them and then apply a color. A few years ago we visited a tiny house where the builder gave us the idea to apply paint and then wipe it off in order to still show the grain pattern and natural beauty of the wood. This is an old wood finishing technique called “pickling”. The term comes from a 16th century technique of whitewashing woods with caustic lime and other such corrosive materials so as to make wood resistant to insects. The process left behind a light, brushed on look that made the wood seem both aged and somewhat ethereal. That look really is making a comeback today, but we didn’t need to use harsh chemicals to achieve a similar look. The process today simply involves brushing on a coat of paint, and then wiping it off before it dries. You can also lightly  sand the paint off for the same effect.  So we decided to give it a shot with our green trim paint!

 

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And here is the result! We like it. It will match the green accents we plan to have throughout the house. We’re waiting to add trim in the bathroom and kitchen because we’ll need to work around the counter, back-splash, and bathroom sink, but so far so good! It’s coming together!

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